Weekly Reflections

Weekly Reflections on Justice are written by the Columban Center for Advocacy and Outreach staff, volunteers, interns, and visiting Columban Missionaries. We hope these reflections help to guide you on your own spiritual journey working toward justice, peace, and the integrity of creation.

  • Easter Season Begins

    By Rebecca Eastwood, CCAO Advocacy Associate

    Yesterday, Easter Sunday marked the end of Lent and the beginning of the Easter season.

    When I was growing up, I remember counting down the days to Easter Sunday every year. This was not simply because I looked forward to the Easter egg hunts with my family or the piles of candy I knew I would find in those eggs, but because Easter marked the end of whatever practice I had decided to give up that Lent.

  • Taste and See

    This week’s reflection is the sixth part of the Lenten Series of our Weekly Reflection on Justice. This 7 week series features people from various parts of the Columban community in the United States. Today’s reflection is from Juan Carlos Garcia. Juan Carlos is the Web Developer for Hispanic Ministry in the United States.

    “Blessed are they who hunger and thirst for righteousness, for they will be satisfied” (Mathew 5:6)

  • Increasing My Regard for Creation

    This week’s reflection is the fifth part of the Lenten Series of our Weekly Reflection on Justice. This 7 week series features people from various parts of the Columban community in the United States. Today’s reflection is from Father Tom Glennon. Father Tom lives in Omaha, Nebraska, but spent many years as a Columban missionary in Taiwan.

    When the big trucks and buses rumbled down the narrow street, my curiosity was peaked. It was unusual to have this kind of traffic in the residential area. So, I asked my father, “why is this happening?”

  • Washing Up

    This week’s reflection is the fourth part of the Lenten Series of our Weekly Reflection on Justice. This 7 week series features people from various parts of the Columban community in the United States. Today’s reflection is from Columban Father, Robert Mosher. Father Mosher has lived and worked in the border town of El Paso, Texas for years where he runs the Columban Mission Center. The reflection below is an excerpt from a recent three-day mission Father Mosher preached at a local parish.

  • Hearts Wide Open

    This week’s reflection is the third part of the Lenten Series of our Weekly Reflection on Justice. This 7 week series features people from various parts of the Columban community in the United States. Today’s reflection is from Amy Woolam Echeverria. Amy began her missionary journey in Chile and currently is the Columban International Coordinator for Justice, Peace, and the Integrity of Creation.

  • What Are You Giving Up for Lent?

    This week’s reflection is the second part of the Lenten Series of our Weekly Reflection on Justice. This 7 week series will feature people from various parts of the Columban community in the United States. Today’ reflection is from Ruth Coyne, a former Ignatian Volunteer at the Columban Center for Advocacy and Outreach in Washington D.C.

  • Our Compelling Need to Live as One

    By Rebecca Eastwood, CCAO Advocacy Associate

    “Politics is, instead, an expression of our compelling need to live as one, in order to build as one the greatest common good: that of a community which sacrifices particular interests in order to share, in justice and peace, its goods, its interests, its social life. I do not underestimate the difficulty that this involves, but I encourage you in this effort.”

    – Pope Francis’ Address to Congress

  • The Sanctity of All Life: When One Person Suffers, All of Us Suffer

    By Ruth Coyne, former Ignatian Corps Volunteer

    Newspaper headlines these days seem to be almost apocalyptic. We read of bombings and nuclear detonations, of rampages in public places. We are offered pictures of refugees huddled without adequate shelter; we read analyses of the muddle in European refugee policies. American policy seems stalled. Syrians are confined to towns but without food and water. They are eating what they can find.

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